Belladonna

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Belladonna

Belladonna

Overview

Belladonna has many names! Here’s a breakdown of some common and interesting ones:

Common Names:

  • Deadly Nightshade: This is the most widely recognized common name, highlighting the plant’s poisonous nature.
  • Devil’s Berries: Another name emphasizing its toxicity.
  • Belladonna Lily: Refers to the attractive flowers of the plant.
  • Wooly Nightshade: Describes the plant’s fuzzy leaves and stems.

Less Common Names:

  • Dwale: An old English term for a hallucinogenic or narcotic substance.
  • Banewort: An old name meaning "death plant."
  • Herb of Fury: Refers to the plant’s potential psychoactive effects.
  • Fair Ladies’ Bane: This name alludes to the use of belladonna to dilate pupils for cosmetic purposes, a potentially dangerous practice.

Scientific Name:

  • Atropa belladonna: This is the official scientific classification for the plant.

Choosing the Right Name:

  • Formal Context: Use "Atropa belladonna" in scientific discussions.
  • Informal Context: "Belladonna" or "Deadly Nightshade" are clear choices.
  • Historical Context: "Dwale" or "Banewort" might be appropriate for historical writing.

Important Note:

  • Regardless of the name used, remember that Belladonna is a highly poisonous plant. Never ingest it or use it without professional medical guidance.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Onset: –

  • Sudden. 
  • Short or long lasting. Pain usually in short attacks, but may also last for indefinite period. 

Character of pain 

  • Pains come suddenly, lasts indefinitely and ceases suddenly. 
  • Pain runs from above downwards. 
  • Pains lightning like incoming and going (Mag. phos.).  
  • Pains are terrible, comes suddenly, last a short time, disappear suddenly  
  • Pains: appear and disappear suddenly (Kall bich. Ign., Eup. perf., Mag. phos.). 

Modalities: –

  • Agg:  from touch; from motion.  
  • Amel: from standing or sitting erect.

Concomitant:

  • i) Pain causes redness of face and eyes.
  • ii) Fullness of head and throbbings of carotids.

 Keynote of Bell. is congestion.

Right sided medicines

  • Ammon. carb 
  • Apis mel 
  • Belladonna  
  • Bryonia 
  • Lycopodium. 
  • Others: Causticum, Podophyllum, Rhus tox 

Tubercular diathesis (Calc. carb., Phosphorus). 

 It develops suddenly and violently. Thus, it is an acute drug (Aconite; – slow & Insidious, Bry., Gels.).

Medicines for sensitiveness to touch

  • Apis mel 
  • Sulphur 
  • Lachesis 
  • Bell 
  • Calc. carb. 
  • (Note: Ref. Bovista chapter of Allen’s key notes). 
  • Belladonna. 
  • Phosphorus
  • Pulsatilla.
  • Belladonna.  
  • Calc. carb. 
  • Helleborus.
  • Belladonna. 
  • Hepar sulph. 

Hydrophobia of Belladonna

  • Hydrophobia: fear of water, with excessive aversion to liquids (Stramo, Lyssin). 
  • Liquids are more painful than solids when swallowing (Bry, Ign, Lach). 

Rash

  • Belladonna 
  • Calc. carb 
  • Graphites. 
  • (Others: Bellis per, Eugenia jamb, Sang. Can, Psorinum) 
  • (Rash before the menses Conium, Dulcamara). 

a) Introduction:

  • Dr. J. H. Clarke reports that Bell. is a headache medicine of par excellence. 
  • Dr. Nash calls it, a ‘head-remedy’. 

b) Suitability:

  • Headache of those who readily become delirious in fever or with pain (Agar.). 
  • Plethoric constitutions. 

c) Causations:

  • Exposure to cold, draught of cold air. 
  • To heat of the sun. 
  • From haircut (Acon., Glon.). 
    • suppression of catarrhal flow.  
    • tobacco-smoking esp. in nervous man (Clarke).  

d) Type:

  • Congestive type of headache.

e) Mode of onset:

  • It is sudden and violent (Acute onset).

f) Location:

  • Right supra ciliary region; forehead.

g) Sensation: 

  • There is sensation of fullness, as if forehead would burst (Ammon. carb., Glon.). Fullness, heaviness and violent pressure on the head esp. in the forehead and sensation as if cranium is going to burst (Clarke). 
  • There is sensation of stabbing as by a knife, from one temple to the other. 
  • Great sensitiveness to touch-sensitive externally, even pressure of the hair gives pain (Acon. China., Merc.). 
  • Also sensation: as if the brain is loose in forehead and falling from side to side (Bry, Sulph. ac. Rhus tox, Spig.).  
  • Ch. of headache: Pain comes suddenly, lasts indefinitely and goes suddenly. 

h) Concomitants 

  • Throbbing of brain & carotids. 
  • Excessive heat of the affected part. 
  • There is rush of blood to head and face.  
  • Redness of eyes and face. 
  • Profuse pungent smelling sweat in head and covered parts (Clarke). 

i) Modalities:  

  • Aggravation from slight noise, from jar; from motion, from every foot step (Aloe., Bry.). 
  • From light, touch, external impressions, etc.  
  • From lying down. 
  • From least exertion, from coughing (Bry.).  
  • From bending head downwards. 
  • In afternoon, etc. Amel.) By tight bandage, pressure. 
  • By menstrual flow (during menses). 
  • By wrapping up the head. 

Note: In Meningitis:  

  • Boring the head into the pillow. 
  • Convulsion during teething, with fever, with head hot and feet cold. 
  • Violent delirium and hallucinations. 
  • Sleepy but can’t sleep. 
  • Urine suppressed. 

Excerpts (Summary)

Belladonna, a powerful homeopathic remedy derived from deadly nightshade, is renowned for its effectiveness in treating acute conditions with sudden onset and intense symptoms. This comprehensive article explores the uses, indications, and safe administration of Belladonna in homeopathy. Learn about its effectiveness in addressing various ailments, including high fever, tonsillitis, headaches, and skin conditions, while understanding its potential for treating mental and emotional symptoms.
Belladonna, a powerful homeopathic remedy derived from deadly nightshade, is renowned for its effectiveness in treating acute conditions with sudden onset and intense symptoms. This comprehensive article explores the uses, indications, and safe administration of Belladonna in homeopathy. Learn about its effectiveness in addressing various ailments, including high fever, tonsillitis, headaches, and skin conditions, while understanding its potential for treating mental and emotional symptoms.

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